BEVA Calls For Rethink On Suspension Of A ‘Gold Standard’ Pain Killer.

Veterinarians are calling for a rethink into the suspension of flunixin for equine use. BEVA Calls For Rethink On Suspension Of A ‘Gold Standard’ Pain Killer.

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[avatar user="AbbyDickinson" size="medium" align="center" link="file"]Everything Horse News Reporter, Abby Dickinson[/avatar]

BEVA Calls For Rethink On Suspension Of A ‘Gold Standard’ Pain Killer

Veterinarians are calling for a rethink into the suspension of flunixin for equine use.

On 26 July, the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), part of Defra, suspended the sale of all injectable forms of flunixin and many other drugs used in horses. The suspension of excipient diethanolamine, an ingredient of flunxin, was done “without warning”, according to the British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA).

Flunixin is a painkiller used for horses undergoing surgery or suffering from colic, or colic-like, symptoms. It is also the only medicine licensed for the treatment of sepsis.

The suspension of excipient diethanolamine was caused by findings from the International Agency on Cancer as a “possibly carcinogenic to humans”.

BEVA have called for the suspension to be lifted from horses not destined for the food chains, with their best interests in equine welfare.

BEVA said there was no warning or consultation with the veterinary profession over the suspension. The BEVA president did state the association was fully supportive of attempts to promote food safety, however a rethink needs to be considered due to the drug being a “gold standard pain killer”, alleviating “crippling” pain.

Currently, there has been no recall notices issued and therefore veterinary surgeons can continue to prescribe medicines held in stock. Although, disruption may arise when veterinary practices run out of the medicine, due to the suspension.

BEVA is calling on the VMD to immediately enable limited batch release of flunixin for use in horses not destined for the human food chain in the interests of animal welfare,”

states the BEVA President.

The equine veterinary profession has always been open to consultation with the VMD on a range of important matters relating to responsible medicine use, antibiotic resistance, horse identification, passports and the horse meat issue. BEVA is perplexed as to why the VMD failed to consult with the equine veterinary industry on the animal welfare impact of withdrawing such an important drug.”

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